Tachyon Sailer

Seeing things from different point of view

libutron:

Nomia iridescens a Bee with colourful abdominal stripes 

This cool bee, scientifically named Nomia iridescens, belongs to the Halictidae Family, a cosmopolitan group commonly referred to as halictid bees and sweat bees.

Nomia iridescens is a conspicuously banded bee with amazing neon-green stripes, which occurs in southeast Asia (India, Borneo, Peninsular malaysia, Philippines).

Sweat bees, play a vital role in the pollination ecology of a region. By having  a wide range of adaptational capabilities, these inhabit all kind of ecological niches both in tropical and temperate regions. In number and kind these anthophilic insects (attracted to flowers) surpass all other bees and thus are mainly responsible for conserving the vegetation germplasm by pollinating a bewildering variety of wild and cultivated entomophilic flora.

References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]

Photo credit: ©Paul Bertner | Locality: Mt. Isarog National Park, Philippines (2014) | [Top] - [Middle] - [Bottom]

(via atrociousfubear)

jonjonathanjon:

thedarkknyght:

jcsp1688:

paleasland:

image

OMG

…now that you think about it…

Never can just scroll by this.

I won’t be satisfied until Rowling writes a short story on how these two end up marrying each other. 

(Source: imsirius, via romy7)

rhamphotheca:

Flock of Ancient ‘Butterfly-Headed’ Flying Reptiles Discovered

by Tia Ghose

An ancient flying reptile with a bizarre, butterflylike head has been unearthed in Brazil.

The new-found pterosaur species, Caiuajara dobruskii, lived about 80 million years ago in an ancient desert oasis. The beast sported a strange bony crest on its head that looked like the wings of a butterfly, and had the wingspan needed to take flight at a very young age.

Hundreds of fossils from the reptile were unearthed in a single bone bed, providing the strongest evidence yet that the flying reptiles were social animals, said study co-author Alexander Kellner, a paleontologist at the Museu Nacional/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro in Brazil…

(read more: Live Science)

illustration by Maurilio Oliveira/Museu Nacional-UFR; photos: Manzig et al, PLOS ONE 2014

explodingrocks:

Marishi tenKawari Kabuto. Edo period (18th century) , JapanA ten-plate silver-splashed iron kawari kabuto, the back rising in a form reminiscent of a tokan (Chinese crown-style helmet) into two pieces of warabi (edible young fern shoots), the front with embossed swirling eyebrows, with a narrow brim, the top plate of the shikoro of iron cut into a row of linked cloud shapes, with small fukigaeshi of cloud profile, a large gilt wood yokodate (side crest) of flames, and the gilt wood maedate (forecrest) in the shape of a drifting cloud with the Sanskrit character for Marishi ten (Skt. Marici), a guardian deity for the samurai.
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explodingrocks:

Marishi tenKawari Kabuto. Edo period (18th century) , Japan
A ten-plate silver-splashed iron kawari kabuto, the back rising in a form reminiscent of a tokan (Chinese crown-style helmet) into two pieces of warabi (edible young fern shoots), the front with embossed swirling eyebrows, with a narrow brim, the top plate of the shikoro of iron cut into a row of linked cloud shapes, with small fukigaeshi of cloud profile, a large gilt wood yokodate (side crest) of flames, and the gilt wood maedate (forecrest) in the shape of a drifting cloud with the Sanskrit character for Marishi ten (Skt. Marici), a guardian deity for the samurai.

(Source: christies.com, via thekimonogallery)

asukakawashima:

A Sister More Like Me - Pages 15-30

Order it Here: http://amzn.to/JvJjId

(via smug-bitch)