Tachyon Sailer

Seeing things from different point of view

rhamphotheca:

Flock of Ancient ‘Butterfly-Headed’ Flying Reptiles Discovered

by Tia Ghose

An ancient flying reptile with a bizarre, butterflylike head has been unearthed in Brazil.

The new-found pterosaur species, Caiuajara dobruskii, lived about 80 million years ago in an ancient desert oasis. The beast sported a strange bony crest on its head that looked like the wings of a butterfly, and had the wingspan needed to take flight at a very young age.

Hundreds of fossils from the reptile were unearthed in a single bone bed, providing the strongest evidence yet that the flying reptiles were social animals, said study co-author Alexander Kellner, a paleontologist at the Museu Nacional/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro in Brazil…

(read more: Live Science)

illustration by Maurilio Oliveira/Museu Nacional-UFR; photos: Manzig et al, PLOS ONE 2014

explodingrocks:

Marishi tenKawari Kabuto. Edo period (18th century) , JapanA ten-plate silver-splashed iron kawari kabuto, the back rising in a form reminiscent of a tokan (Chinese crown-style helmet) into two pieces of warabi (edible young fern shoots), the front with embossed swirling eyebrows, with a narrow brim, the top plate of the shikoro of iron cut into a row of linked cloud shapes, with small fukigaeshi of cloud profile, a large gilt wood yokodate (side crest) of flames, and the gilt wood maedate (forecrest) in the shape of a drifting cloud with the Sanskrit character for Marishi ten (Skt. Marici), a guardian deity for the samurai.
View high resolution

explodingrocks:

Marishi tenKawari Kabuto. Edo period (18th century) , Japan
A ten-plate silver-splashed iron kawari kabuto, the back rising in a form reminiscent of a tokan (Chinese crown-style helmet) into two pieces of warabi (edible young fern shoots), the front with embossed swirling eyebrows, with a narrow brim, the top plate of the shikoro of iron cut into a row of linked cloud shapes, with small fukigaeshi of cloud profile, a large gilt wood yokodate (side crest) of flames, and the gilt wood maedate (forecrest) in the shape of a drifting cloud with the Sanskrit character for Marishi ten (Skt. Marici), a guardian deity for the samurai.

(Source: christies.com, via thekimonogallery)

asukakawashima:

A Sister More Like Me - Pages 15-30

Order it Here: http://amzn.to/JvJjId

(via smug-bitch)

jtotheizzoe:

ted:

Eerie, beautiful, captivating images of sea urchins mating and being born (that little triangle guy is a baby sea urchin).

These are a glimpse of how life begins in the deep ocean — and there’s a lot of life down there. The oceans provide about 190 times as much living space as every other space on Earth — soil, air and fresh water — put together. A vast array of amazing creatures live in the depths of this watery world. Squid, jellyfish, and plankton are just a few of our favorites (all shown as tiny babies in that last gif).

Learn more here »

I’m strongly urchin you to fall in love with echinoderms. Such superb sea symmetry.

(via ichthyologist)

libutron:

The Extravagant Black Bat flower
The unusual Black Bat flower, Tacca chantrieri (Dioscoreales - Dioscoreaceae), is quite distinctive by the strange, unique, near black flowers. The flowers, which can grow up to 25 cm long, have four large, dark-purple bracts and long bracteoles, giving the inflorescence a striking appearance that superficially resemble a flying bat, a sinister face, or a mean tiger with whiskers.
Tacca chantrieri is an endangered species that occurs in tropical regions of SE Asia including Thailand, Malaysia, and southern China, particularly Yunnan Province.
The features of these flowers have been assumed to function as a ‘‘deceit syndrome’’ in which reproductive structures resemble decaying organic material attracting flies that facilitate cross-pollination (sapromyiophily). However, a study on pollination and mating in Tacca chantrieri populations from SW China, has shown that despite considerable investment in extravagant display, populations of this species are predominantly selfing and that flowers have several traits that promote autonomous self-pollination.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Stephanie Lichlyter 
Locality: Cultivated (Conservatory of Flowers, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California, US) View high resolution

libutron:

The Extravagant Black Bat flower

The unusual Black Bat flower, Tacca chantrieri (Dioscoreales - Dioscoreaceae), is quite distinctive by the strange, unique, near black flowers. The flowers, which can grow up to 25 cm long, have four large, dark-purple bracts and long bracteoles, giving the inflorescence a striking appearance that superficially resemble a flying bat, a sinister face, or a mean tiger with whiskers.

Tacca chantrieri is an endangered species that occurs in tropical regions of SE Asia including Thailand, Malaysia, and southern China, particularly Yunnan Province.

The features of these flowers have been assumed to function as a ‘‘deceit syndrome’’ in which reproductive structures resemble decaying organic material attracting flies that facilitate cross-pollination (sapromyiophily). However, a study on pollination and mating in Tacca chantrieri populations from SW China, has shown that despite considerable investment in extravagant display, populations of this species are predominantly selfing and that flowers have several traits that promote autonomous self-pollination.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Stephanie Lichlyter

Locality: Cultivated (Conservatory of Flowers, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California, US)

(via rhamphotheca)